Future of Policing

Future of Policing

Technology is the biggest issue that affect policing. Technology has grown at an incredible rate in the past decade. Today, criminals use technology advancements to commit crimes in an easier and effective way. Recent studies show that police will soon lose jobs as well as other persons working in law enforcement as; a result advancements in technology. For instance, police officers will not be on patrols, and they will not monitor traffic. At present, there are high-speed cameras that detect traffic flow monitoring, vehicle counting and incident detection. In addition, these cameras also detect people who violate traffic laws such as; running red lights, speeding, and stop signs.
With this trend, more cameras will be placed in high populated areas in order to maintain law and order. In some areas, sophisticated surveillance cameras with facial recognition are used to identify every individual in the vicinity. On the face of it, these trends will either be potentially used against policing by smart criminals or will affect policing in a good way. Modern nations such as Canada, Britain, and the United States are not monopolizing policing. Unlike before when the state offered policing, institutions and private companies have started offering policing on a commercial basis (Edwards, 2005, p. 81).
Most police agencies are making numerous and coherent changes in their sharing of information and communicating skills. They are effectively doing this with the help of computers that are programmed to tackle certain tasks. In this century, cameras and computers are widely used to assist law enforcers in stopping criminal activities, and arresting criminals. For this reason, the future of policing is seemingly clear in the direction it is heading. To meet the needs of the people, policing has slowly reformed to reduce crime, and make livelihoods easier. Among the reforms that will possibly take place in the future are better consolidation of police departments, police managers, and police officers to upgrade technology, and save resources and money. In addition, other reforms that will take place in the future include; improved proactive planning and techniques, and better testing techniques to promote and recruit within the department. Subsequently, community policing will become widely used and implemented since it affects people of all walks of life (Newburn, 2008, p. 15). Seemingly, since it was first introduced into the police unit, community policing has been evolving, therefore, more reforms will take effect in the future.
In order meet all the challenges of the digital age, paramount lessons from the security sector must be learned. Secondly, police will also have to learn ways of keeping pace with extremists and criminals who exploit sophisticated technologies to coordinate and plan their activities. Markedly, the only way to allow limited resources to be focused on vanguard activities is through creating a balance between enforcement and intelligence. Much has to be done to design the NCA operating model, and protect new legislation. Police intelligence will be modernized in the digital age where various strategic business and operational choices will be made. Consequently, the balance between delivering efficient enforcement operations and investigating police intelligence capabilities will be made. These changes will include;
• Responding to changes in criminal behavior, and technology; in this regard, intelligence capabilities will put up with the expected pace to curb serious crime and terrorism, and the environment responsible for communication will have to change quickly as well.
• Balancing the need for security with civil liberties and public privacy; to maintain public confidence, the current scrutiny and oversight bodies must adapt to the use of intrusive surveillance.
• Learning lessons from the security and defense sector; the effectiveness and efficiency of the law enforcement community will be increased through knowledge and collaboration sharing.
• Changing ways of working to utilize new surveillance capabilities; when this is done, law enforcers and police will be able to achieve faster income and utilize the surveillance resources.
The current political and economic trends will have an effect on how various forms take place. Trends such as increased medical services will influence the benefits and salaries of officers. The advancement of economical technology that supports instant communication through personal computers and cell phones will significantly improve distribution of information and response time effectively and quickly. With the growing crime activity of multinational organized crime activity, the need for effective communication between nations will be created. Policing reforms will also be shaped up by the increased concerns in crimes committed by persons with sophisticated weapons, threats against infrastructure, and violent juveniles (Thomas, 2011, p. 14). Due to the high concern with terrorism, homeland security will be allocated more security. Ideally, these resources will have to compensate because they could have helped police and domestic crime management in various forums. Subsequently, smart credit cards, global positioning systems, and DNA identification will help in shaping the expected policing model.
Use of cost-effective police services is arguably one of the main problem facing numerous police departments. In order to dispose of copied services and cut cost, consolidation should be used as the initial aspect of policing. Instead of the norm where all categories of law enforcers such as sheriffs, county and state police share the same area of authority, consolidating some of it would significantly reduce a large amount of money that is used in patrols. Such an implementation would reduce the issue of sharing information between departments. Competition for resources, personnel, and calls would be eliminated once consolidation of departments is done (Steverson, 2008, p. 22).
In conclusion, police agencies ought to utilize and take advantage of all sophisticated and new technologies that could help them become more proactive in order to fight crime easily. With the use of hand-held computers or laptops in cars, police can effectively carryout their tasks as these gadgets can show demographic characteristics, map response and street grids, and actual time crime is committed. At the touch of a button, occurrences such as, trend-analysis grids, energy blackouts, and civilian disasters would be available for planners. The future for policing appears to be headed in the right direction as it is focusing on improved communication between the public and departments. Reforms such as an international police force ought to be more focused to avoid dreadful disasters such as the September 11th. Despite efforts and plans to advance policing, policing seems to stagnate due to the slow and gradual transmission. However, recent research shows that with this trend, policing will gradually improve as reforms taken into consideration.

References
Edwards, C. J. (2005). Changing policing theories for 21st century societies. Leichhardt,, Australia: Federation Press.
Newburn, T. (2008). The future of policing (pp. 824-841). Willan Publishing.
Steverson, L. A. (2008). Policing in America: A reference handbook. Santa Barbara, Calif: ABC- CLIO.
Thomas, D. J. (2011). Professionalism in policing: An introduction. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Cengage Learning.